Exemptions to Tucson Face Mask Proclamation

ACDL News, Disability Law 5 comments

Today Tucson Mayor, Regina Romero, issued a proclamation requiring Tucsonans 2 years of age and older to wear a mask when in public where continuous physical distancing is difficult or impossible. The requirement goes into effect at 6 a.m. Saturday, June 20.

There are exemptions, which include:

• Those who fall under CDC guidance for those who should not wear a face covering, including but not limited to any child under the age of 2.

• Any person who cannot wear a face-covering because of a medical condition, mental health condition or developmental disability, or who is unable to remove the face covering without assistance.

• Public safety employees and/or emergency responders, when wearing a mask would interfere with or limit their ability to carry out their duties or functions.

• People exercising outdoors, or walking or exercising with other persons of the same household, as long as physical distancing from others is maintained.

We are committed during this time to continuing our services to protect and advocate for people with disabilities. If you have been denied access to necessary services due to COVID-19 or feel that your legal rights have been violated, please contact us at 1-800-927-2260 or email at center@azdisabilitylaw.org.

Read the full City of Tucson Proclamation HERE.

 

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5 comments

Joseph duran - June 19, 2020 Reply

I am in a wheelchair do I have to wear a mask

Daniel L Morgan - June 21, 2020 Reply

And how long is this Royal Proclamation to last for?
Under what legal authority is this Mayor allowed to make such an intrusion on our civil rights and liberties?
Under what ARS will a person be fined under?

Daniel L Morgan - June 21, 2020 Reply

Also I forgot to ask, what scientific data is this proclamation based upon?
If you say CDC or W.H.O. then you have lost all credibility, since both have been completely wrong about this Covid 19 since day one.
According to Arizona Health Department Services, as of today, we have 46,689 confirmed cases, sadly 1,312 deaths. According to United States Census, Arizona has a population of 7,278,717. That is rate of 0.64% tested positive, 0.018% death rate. According to Webster dictionary, the definition of pandemic is “occurring over a wide geographic area AND affecting an EXCEPTIONALLY HIGH proportion of the population.” It seems to me, 0.64% does not seem like an exceptionally high proportion…
So again, what Scientific and Medical basis are you using as a reason for this ORDER of yours?
I see none what so ever. The only thing I see is a power grab based on the gutless State Governor relinquishing his.

Lori Chappell - June 23, 2020 Reply

Thank you for taking action to slow this horrific spread. If everyone would comply, we could get thru this faster.

DJones - July 6, 2020 Reply

Feasibility and Adaptations

CDC recognizes that wearing cloth face coverings may not be possible in every situation or for some people. In some situations, wearing a cloth face covering may exacerbate a physical or mental health condition, lead to a medical emergency, or introduce significant safety concerns. Adaptations and alternatives should be considered whenever possible to increase the feasibility of wearing a cloth face covering or to reduce the risk of COVID-19 spreading if it is not possible to wear one.

For example,

People who are deaf or hard of hearing—or those who care for or interact with a person who is hearing impaired—may be unable to wear cloth face coverings if they rely on lipreading to communicate. In this situation, consider using a clear face covering. If a clear face covering isn’t available, consider whether you can use written communication, use closed captioning, or decrease background noise to make communication possible while wearing a cloth face covering that blocks your lips.
Some people, such as people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, mental health conditions or other sensory sensitivities, may have challenges wearing a cloth face covering. They should consult with their healthcare provider for advice about wearing cloth face coverings.
Younger children (e.g., preschool or early elementary aged) may be unable to wear a cloth face covering properly, particularly for an extended period of time. Wearing of cloth face coverings may be prioritized at times when it is difficult to maintain a distance of 6 feet from others (e.g., during carpool drop off or pick up, or when standing in line at school). Ensuring proper cloth face covering size and fit and providing children with frequent reminders and education on the importance and proper wear of cloth face coverings may help address these issues.
People should not wear cloth face coverings while engaged in activities that may cause the cloth face covering to become wet, like when swimming at the beach or pool. A wet cloth face covering may make it difficult to breathe. For activities like swimming, it is particularly important to maintain physical distance from others when in the water.
People who are engaged in high intensity activities, like running, may not be able to wear a cloth face covering if it causes difficulty breathing. If unable to wear a cloth face covering, consider conducting the activity in a location with greater ventilation and air exchange (for instance, outdoors versus indoors) and where it is possible to maintain physical distance from others.
People who work in a setting where cloth face coverings may increase the risk of heat-related illness or cause safety concerns due to introduction of a hazard (for instance, straps getting caught in machinery) may consult with an occupational safety and health professional to determine the appropriate face covering for their setting. Outdoor workers may prioritize use of cloth face coverings when in close contact with other people, like during group travel or shift meetings, and remove face coverings when social distancing is possible. Find more information here and below.

Cloth face coverings are a critical preventive measure and are most essential in times when social distancing is difficult. If cloth face coverings cannot be used, make sure to take other measures to reduce the risk of COVID-19 spread, including social distancing, frequent hand washing, and cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces.

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